Ships Forced To Drift Off, After Record 95 Vessels In Queue At Los Angeles and Long Beach Ports

A record number of vessels are being forced to drift off the San Pedro Bay, as the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports continue to break new congestion records with each passing day.

Ships Forced To Drift Off, After Record 95 Vessels In Queue At Los Angeles and Long Beach Ports
Representational Image of The Port of Los Angeles | Image Via: Port of Los Angeles

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Over 95 vessels are either at anchor or are in drift areas, outside the southern California ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, reports yesterday’s update from the Marine Exchange of Southern California. Out of these 95 ships in queue, about 70 are container-ships, while the rest are bulk carriers, oil tankers and more. A record number of 37 ships, which include 29 container-ships are now being forced to drift in the Pacific Ocean.

The typical process of drifting sees a vessel move a few miles away from its position, before returning back to the same. This in-turn burns a substantial amount of vessel fuel. The time required for a ship to secure a berth space from the back of the queue now stands at about three weeks.

Read More Congestion News

As reported by marinemonks yesterday, the San Pedro ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have taken the first step towards a 24/7 supply chain and to combat the congestion, by increasing the number of hours in course of which trucks can take up and return containers with an aim to enhance freight movement and bring down delays through the ports as they continue to experience record volumes.

Ships Forced To Drift Off, After Record 95 Vessels In Queue At Los Angeles and Long Beach Ports
AIS Data Representing The Unprecedented Congestion | Via: marinemonks Live AIS Vessel Tracking, Powered By MarineTraffic

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On September 18th, the congestion at Los Angeles and Long Beach Ports broke a second record as over 65 container-ships were queued outside the San Pedro ports.

All the anchorages at the two ports, which are often referred to as America’s top two maritime gateways, are reportedly full, while all that can be seen from the Californian coastline are steel hulls and laden boxships.

The average time it takes for ocean freight to go door-to-door has increased from 50 days to 71.5, which translates to a whopping increase of about 43%, as compared to that of 2020, shows the data from Freightos.

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